UO REVIEW: FIELD DAY

May 28, 2013
UO REVIEW: FIELD DAY

Oh hello again Field Day, old friend…. The unofficial East End hipster playground which boasted a line-up that had seen us drooling at every artist reveal, we soon reached hyperventilation levels when there was bona fide SUNSHINE for the occasion this year! Finest creps on, the idea of wearing ‘sensible shoes’ to combat potential trench foot at this street style bonanza quickly becoming a distant memory. High fives!

UO REVIEW: FIELD DAY

Whether it was the sweet, sweet sun across Hackney or the impressive lineup which acted as a veritable pick and mix for your new favourite band, if you could bottle the vibe at Field Day and sell it, you’d kick back and consider your life’s work was done. Hire us, Sir Alan. Whereas previous Field Day festivals might have felt little more than a fitting background to a thousand fashion blogs and with more posing than partying, this year was noticeably different with even the queues to the bar and the toilets made e-asy, ensuring a day in the leafy Victoria Park was a bank holiday weekend dream. So we partied. And we partied hard.

UO REVIEW: FIELD DAY

First up? The younger, edgier Knowles sister, Solange. And we can rely on THIS sister not to incite the All the Single Ladies routine from your recently dumped ‘but, like, totally ok with it’ mate. Bonus. Playing the ever brilliant Losing You from her recent work with ex-Test Icicles (remember them?) and all round excellent Dev Hynes, this was the highlight of a musical catalogue which can sometimes feel a little bit all-filler-no-killer R’n’B fare. Great monochrome get up and moves – and the closest a lot of us will get to seeing Beyonce this Summer – but this set did, alas, prove that the Knowles midas touch is something that’s earned rather than inherited.

UO REVIEW: FIELD DAY

Next up, and framed by blazing sunshine, we watched Everything Everything play syncopated stuff we could throw some pretty interesting shapes to. These guys put on a buzzing set that sadly, Solange couldn’t quite nail on the same stage. Alright our kid – we like these Mancunian movers quite a bit.

UO REVIEW: FIELD DAY

Look, we don’t know how Disclosure crept onto our most spun list at Urban Outfitters HQ, nor why we find this sibling duo’s take on dance-pop just so addictive but it’s happened and we’re hooked. It looked like about half of Field Day’s punters felt the same as we descended en masse to the Bugged Out! stage ready to put our hands in the air like we JUST didn’t care.

These guys, whilst perfectly suited to their home in Bugged Out! could have done with a bigger space and their inevitable stratospheric rise to the top means next time, we’ll look forward to doing Bez-style dancing under the stars at a rave time appropriate to this pop perfection, rather than during an early bird special of…er.. 7.25pm.



We headed to the Laneway stage for headliners Django Django (sorry TNGHT and Animal Collective who put in a good fight to be our closing heroes for the evening). With more flashing lights than an over-zealous Christmas tree, the theatricality of this set was a fitting end to what we’re fondly remembering as one of the best Field Day’s yet.

These Scottish Art Rockers definitely had an air of Franz Ferdinand to their angular posing, but we’ll forgive them that for an energetic rattle through their debut album via the always excellent Default – trust us, we’ve listened to this track 872318725371527351 times and we still love it more than a hipster loves a selfie.



With a set more uplifting than a can of Redbull for the inevitable onset of festival fatigue, we descended onto the night safe in the knowledge we didn’t even have to camp at the end of it. Field Day – we found love in a hopeless place (and we didn’t even end up losing our minds in notorious Hackney dive The Dolphin afterwards). Success.